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HP L25500

Offline bosdub Posted 04-13-2010 - 04:58 AM
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Onyx Version:
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HP-Z6100, HP-10000, & Oce 360GT, HP L26500, L360

Just wondering if anyone has an L25500 and what your thoughts are on it?
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Offline Scott Posted 04-13-2010 - 04:40 PM
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I'm curious to hear as well. We've been looking into the 104" L65500 as a replacement for our old 72" Colorspan.

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Offline jonkovach Posted 04-16-2010 - 04:21 AM
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Onyx Version:
X11
Printer(s):
HP z6100, Mimaki JV33-160, HP Latex 370

I don't have an L2550, but I saw them at the ISA trade show, and have talked to a few people about them.

One thing is, in my opinion, that the colors seem a little bit more washed out than with solvent inks. I don't know for sure, since I haven't profiled, and I haven't tried different medias - as I don't own one... but that is one thing I noticed. (But maybe I'm just being picky, too!!)

I also had a very interesting conversation with another printer manufacturer (it was biased, I'm sure) about the printer. The L is being touted as the "green" alternative... but how green is it?

Well, the ink is latex - and sure that is green, good for the environment, no VOCs, etc... and that latex ink is suspended in a water droplet, set on the media, then heated - that heat dries out the water, it evaporates, and the ink adheres to the media. Great - that is good. Nobody ever died from breathing in evaporated water.

But, what happens to that vinyl that is made in China when it is heated to 150-200 degrees Fahrenheit (or however hot it heats)... what kinds of fumes does it let off?

Also, it takes two 220 power supplies to run the beast (this was the L6550 that I was looking at)... it is a monstrosity! You can run four z6100s on the same power supply. That is a big, huge environmental footprint!

So, green? Maybe, maybe not. But I don't know how much that matters to you - all industries are different. It is important to my industry (until we explain that green products cost more, and recycled paper might not be as good quality as virgin fiber paper..... go figure).

That's my 2 cents - looks like a nice machine, though! Hope you can find someone that is using it locally, so you can tinker for free!!!
I noticed in another, older post that Fluxcap has an L2550 - maybe he will spot this and chime in......
(This post was last modified: 04-16-2010 04:31 AM by jonkovach.)
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Offline fluxcap Posted 04-18-2010 - 04:24 PM
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Onyx Version:
Onyx 7.3.2
Printer(s):
HP Z6100, L22550, 5500, Seiko 64s, Seiko H-74

Yeap I have a L25500 we bought a few different machines at once due to government incentives here in Australia so am only just really starting to play around with it more. It does have 2 power supplies and they are 20amps each, supplier keeps saying these will use less power than the solvent printers but with the amount of heating and fans I am wary of this, will let you know when we get our first power bill how this has changed Smiley

Results on Backlit, Adhesive Vinyl and HP Photo Paper have been great. Only problem we are having is HP are having problems supplying stock for this machine so everyone here is having to try 3rd party medias. On thing that is good about this machine is that the prints are dry immediately and are scratch resistant similar to solvent prints, so this saves us quite a bit of time as most of our customers want there prints now.

There is a slight smell from certain medias when they heat up but it is nowhere as strong as the solvent inks, so we have this machine in our production area versus the solvent which is in a room of its own. Getting the tempretures right does take a bit of work as the machine cures around 85C - 110C and you have to get it where you arent heating the media too much that you are altering the shape of it.

Quality wise the prints are sharp as it borrows a lot of its smarts from the HP Designjet Z6100, Optical feed media sensor and eye-one built in so cant complain there. One thing that is a shame is that it only comes with CMYKLcLm theres is no grey ink which makes outdoor posters a bit more challenging as grey seems to be the in colour at the moment. We quizzed HP if they had any plans to release one with it and was told no.

I will keep you guys updated as we progress with running this machine Smiley
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Offline Hotspur Posted 04-19-2010 - 01:49 PM
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We've used these for six months now - we do sell them as well but I'll put down my rose-tinted spectacles for a minute and try to be objective...

The green thing seems to get a lot of people hot & bothered. If you look at HPs marketing you'll find it third on their list of attributes behind versatility and ease of use so it's there and important but not the key selling point.

The competition seem to have missed this and spend their energy on "greenwash" arguments and add to the confusion so here are some points that might clarify:

1. It will use about twice the power of a similar standard low / eco solvent printer like-for-like.

Over here thats the difference between 4pence psqm Latex and 2pence psqm solvent in electricity costs. You need to judge if that is an issue for your own business.
In this regard if you use an air purifier or a heater in front of your solvent printer then the power consumption is pretty similar.

2. Ink is green but what about the wider environmental issues - PVC / transportation etc?

Perfectly good points - Latex will not save the world (esp. using PVC!) The green issues that matter for those that buy this is that the operating environment is safe, there are no waste issues and when used in conjunction with recyclable media, the output is accepted by sensitive markets.

By this I mean the big brands who want to appear responsible, local govt, schools, retail, medical etc - the "green" output simply gives the user access to more markets than can be served with solvent.

Unfortunately no-one I have met actually seems to worry about the environmental arguments as long as they can future-proof their waste costs and access more markets. I guess that's business for you.

3. Gamut - measurably better than the low and eco solvents we have (using Gamut report of course!) Orange 021c had a lower deltaE than a Z6100 using a good photo paper.

However - not surprised you saw some dodgy results early on. This is not the easiest printer in the world to profile. As well as the normal variables you have the extra heat to play with and this can make a big difference on some media. Setting up the media before you read a single swatch is the key to this printer & can take a while to get to grips with.

4. Normal printing speed is around 10sqm/h - rarely do you push it faster. Thus it is not intended for high volume work. If you are printing 1000s of sqm or need 30-40sqm/h on Vinyl this not the printer for you.

5. Biggest pull for most people is either the indoor/outdoor versatility - "one printer does it all" for smaller print shops, or the fact that the output is fully cured on leaving the printer for vehicle graphics.

If you wrap a vehicle with solvent-printed vinyl you have to wait for 6-12 hours to let it de-gas before finishing and applying to ensure no delamination issues. With Latex there is no waiting so overall production speed is hugely faster - thus most early adopters were in this business as the benefits were so much bigger Vs traditional methods.

6. Is it easier to operate than solvent? depends on what you compare it against.

It runs similar self-assessment and maintenance routines to the Z6100 so compared to many traditional mild solvent printers then yes it's much cleaner and easier to care for.
No daily maintenance required, printheads are user-replaceable, nozzles checked & replaced on the fly etc etc.

However eco-solvents like Mutoh Valuejets are pretty low-maintenance and whilst not having the automated systems of the HP are almost as easy to care for as long as you use them regularly.

They seem pretty reliable so far - basically it's the Z6100 chassis with extra heating systems so its a proven design for the most part. Also the inks been around for 18 months & the outdoor performance is now accepted.

There are other pros & cons - I'm sure those on here with an L25 can testify - but for what it's worth these ones seem to matter most with the users who want to see one.
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Offline bosdub Posted 04-20-2010 - 04:10 AM
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Onyx Version:
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HP-Z6100, HP-10000, & Oce 360GT, HP L26500, L360

Thanks all for the input. Makes me think at this point I'll keep running my HP 10000.
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Offline Scott Posted 04-22-2010 - 10:35 AM
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We pulled the triggered and closed the deal on the L65500. We should have it within 30 days.

Scott Manwaring / Administrator
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Offline jonkovach Posted 07-15-2010 - 04:25 AM
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Onyx Version:
X11
Printer(s):
HP z6100, Mimaki JV33-160, HP Latex 370

(04-22-2010 10:35 AM)Scott Wrote:  We pulled the triggered and closed the deal on the L65500. We should have it within 30 days.


First of all, Hotspur, thank you for all the information. That was an excellent read - even though I just saw it now (not sure why I didn't get an email alert, or if I did, I missed it)... very good to read, as I'm considering buying a solvent printer right now.... maybe I'll go with an L25.

Scott - how is your new purchase going?

Jon

He who limps is still walking.
~Stanislaw J. Lec

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Offline ttlcntrlprint Posted 08-03-2010 - 11:45 AM
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Printer(s):
HP L25500-HP Z6100's-Summa S160T

Hi Hotspur, we've just had the L25500 installed with ONYX X and loads of canned profiles for the time being. I'm used to calibrating, linearising and profiling our Z6100 and 5500s but haven't had time to start profiling the L25500 yet so any pointers would be really appreciated.
One thing the engineer did tell us the biggest problem areas seem to be adjusting the 'dry' drying times and the 'cure' drying times. The other main problem area is adjusting the 'vacuum' settings to compensate for 'vertical banding' uneven lay down issues with low ink coverage especially on cheaper substrates?

Thanks in advance,
Christian
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Offline MarcoRoos Posted 08-09-2010 - 04:55 AM
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(08-03-2010 11:45 AM)ttlcntrlprint Wrote:  Hi Hotspur, we've just had the L25500 installed with ONYX X and loads of canned profiles for the time being. I'm used to calibrating, linearising and profiling our Z6100 and 5500s but haven't had time to start profiling the L25500 yet so any pointers would be really appreciated.
One thing the engineer did tell us the biggest problem areas seem to be adjusting the 'dry' drying times and the 'cure' drying times. The other main problem area is adjusting the 'vacuum' settings to compensate for 'vertical banding' uneven lay down issues with low ink coverage especially on cheaper substrates?

Thanks in advance,
Christian

We have been creating tons of profiles for the L25500 for more than a year now. We are working as a Global R&D partner with HP on this particular technology.

Profiling this printer is not easy, in fact it is probably the most the difficult machine we ever had in our profiling lab (we have around 30 here). Once it runs and you know what to do, it does a great job and the quality is high.

Couple of things you need to pay attention to:
1. Use a low amount of light inks. When using ONYX X10 set the gamut size in ink restrictions to coated (this drops the light inks to 20%) depending on your media you might even go lower.

2. Make sure you make some big prints with 'difficult' color bars to see if you temperature settings aren't causing vertical and horizontal banding. We use green, blue, red and a composite gray bar on the full media width and around 20" in height to judge this.

3. The curing temperature is the one that reaches the highest temperature. In case you see issues with the media (waving effect, wrinkling etc.) drop this temperature.

4. In case you see dark banding or coalesence increase the heat airflow setting. The settings HP recommends in the RIP driver are for categories of media, you might need to adjust them.

In general: try to get the light inks down and try to avoid to high temperatures.

Hope this helps a bit. I strongly recommend you to use X10, this makes profiling this printer a lot easier, compared to 7.x. In case you use 7.x you have to enable the OEM Dot pattern and configure your own light ink curves. This is not easy and a trial-and-error process. I attached 1 curve you can import in the OEM Dot pattern dialog, this is a curve we created here and it gives pretty good results with most media. Make sure you set the ink restriction for your dark inks also from this dialog!! Before printing the test file make sure you CMYK (dark inks) are all set to 100!

In regards to the ICC profile:
you can use a pretty low blackstart (between 15 and 20) and a GCR High curve. Since the black drops are pretty small the effect of a low black start is hardly visible. It will give a more stable gray balance over a longer period of time.

In most cases you will need to use the Advanced Inklimit. Read the ONYX documentation on how to use the BIC (Black Ink Compensation) since you will need it. Especially on (non photo) paper based medias (like blue-back and uncoated paper) you will need it.


Attached File(s)
.zip  SepCtrl Curve L25500.zip (Size: 589 bytes / Downloads: 33)
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Offline ttlcntrlprint Posted 08-10-2010 - 01:06 PM
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Hi MacroRoos, thank you so much for the advice. This is exactly why I join forums, fantastic stuff. I'll be in contact and let the forum know how I'm getting along with the L25500.

Thanks again,
Christian
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Offline Hotspur Posted 08-10-2010 - 11:30 PM
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Cheers Marco - you da Man!
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Offline ALC Posted 08-11-2010 - 07:10 PM
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Another point to be careful of while profiling is post-print handling. Because of the curing process it's possible for the prints to develop an oily film well after printing. You can test for this by rolling or stacking your test print after it is off the machine. Sometimes the greasy film can appear after only 10 minutes. It needs air much like a solvent print needs outgassing overnight to get rid of it. If you want to use the take-up roll it is essential to test for this. We find the canned profiles suffer from this on our machine. We've spent hours profiling and still have huge problems controlling it. I expect the next generation of this model will have many improvements.
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Offline Hotspur Posted 08-13-2010 - 03:02 AM
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Hi ALC

That's really interesting - can you give some more details..

Are you saying prints are sticking together when stacked or rolled? also what media are you using and how fast are you driving the printer?

All substrates should be fully dry and cured on leaving the printer - you may see a slight "matting" appearence on heavily inked areas but this should be cured and not oily or sticky.

I have seen sticky prints before though. When the drying temp was too low and the print speed too high to remove all the water from the ink before it went to the curing stage. An alteration to the settings solved this issue.

Also sometimes a low curing temp has left the surface wet with partially-cured ink. However if it is this then it will never cure and you are saying it eventually dries so that leads me to the first heater which removes the water being the issue.

I have also seen media stored & used in humid conditions which increased the natural moisture content of the substrate beyond that which the normal canned settings could cope - a change to the environmental conditions was the solution here so maybe there is a way to solve your problem.

I have printed many HP and non-HP medias on the L25 and have not seen a sticky oily film under normal conditions that could not be sorted by a revised media setup or had issues with stacking or rolling requiring gassing off, so hopefully there will be an answer to this.

Technically the first heater removes the carrier part of the ink - in the case of Latex this is water & makes up most of the total ink volume.

This then leaves the rest which is a mixture of alcohols, the ink pigment itself, and resin polymer particles.

The second "curing" heater then removes the alcohols and heats the resin to melting point where it essentially encapsulates the ink pigment inside, giving it the outdoor durability.

Thus it seems the first heater may not be removing enough water from the ink, leaving water to interefere with the efficiency of the curing process.

Only problem is, as Marco points out, you can raise the temps too high and cause other issues so it is a balancing act.

Let me know if i've understood your issue correctly.
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Offline ALC Posted 08-13-2010 - 06:48 PM
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(08-13-2010 03:02 AM)Hotspur Wrote:  Hi ALC

That's really interesting - can you give some more details..

Are you saying prints are sticking together when stacked or rolled? also what media are you using and how fast are you driving the printer?

All substrates should be fully dry and cured on leaving the printer - you may see a slight "matting" appearence on heavily inked areas but this should be cured and not oily or sticky.

I have seen sticky prints before though. When the drying temp was too low and the print speed too high to remove all the water from the ink before it went to the curing stage. An alteration to the settings solved this issue.

Also sometimes a low curing temp has left the surface wet with partially-cured ink. However if it is this then it will never cure and you are saying it eventually dries so that leads me to the first heater which removes the water being the issue.

I have also seen media stored & used in humid conditions which increased the natural moisture content of the substrate beyond that which the normal canned settings could cope - a change to the environmental conditions was the solution here so maybe there is a way to solve your problem.

I have printed many HP and non-HP medias on the L25 and have not seen a sticky oily film under normal conditions that could not be sorted by a revised media setup or had issues with stacking or rolling requiring gassing off, so hopefully there will be an answer to this.

Technically the first heater removes the carrier part of the ink - in the case of Latex this is water & makes up most of the total ink volume.

This then leaves the rest which is a mixture of alcohols, the ink pigment itself, and resin polymer particles.

The second "curing" heater then removes the alcohols and heats the resin to melting point where it essentially encapsulates the ink pigment inside, giving it the outdoor durability.

Thus it seems the first heater may not be removing enough water from the ink, leaving water to interefere with the efficiency of the curing process.

Only problem is, as Marco points out, you can raise the temps too high and cause other issues so it is a balancing act.

Let me know if i've understood your issue correctly.

Thanks for your input Hotspur.

I was more putting the issue out there rather than looking for a solution. We are leaving it up to HP to work it out. I'd consider ourselves advanced users in both RIP and hardware. Prints off the machine are dry, it's later they become oily if the face of the print is covered. Even on 16 pass! I think its fair to say that this could potentially cause problems later on if a laminate was applied before the print is completely cured. Try printing large highly saturated solids across the print width and roll the print up immediately after printing. If it's still dry then you've got no problems. Hopefully this is just isolated to our machine, but it appears to be operating correctly apparently.

Thanks
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Offline MarcoRoos Posted 08-16-2010 - 12:13 AM
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(08-13-2010 06:48 PM)ALC Wrote:  
(08-13-2010 03:02 AM)Hotspur Wrote:  Hi ALC

That's really interesting - can you give some more details..

Are you saying prints are sticking together when stacked or rolled? also what media are you using and how fast are you driving the printer?

All substrates should be fully dry and cured on leaving the printer - you may see a slight "matting" appearence on heavily inked areas but this should be cured and not oily or sticky.

I have seen sticky prints before though. When the drying temp was too low and the print speed too high to remove all the water from the ink before it went to the curing stage. An alteration to the settings solved this issue.

Also sometimes a low curing temp has left the surface wet with partially-cured ink. However if it is this then it will never cure and you are saying it eventually dries so that leads me to the first heater which removes the water being the issue.

I have also seen media stored & used in humid conditions which increased the natural moisture content of the substrate beyond that which the normal canned settings could cope - a change to the environmental conditions was the solution here so maybe there is a way to solve your problem.

I have printed many HP and non-HP medias on the L25 and have not seen a sticky oily film under normal conditions that could not be sorted by a revised media setup or had issues with stacking or rolling requiring gassing off, so hopefully there will be an answer to this.

Technically the first heater removes the carrier part of the ink - in the case of Latex this is water & makes up most of the total ink volume.

This then leaves the rest which is a mixture of alcohols, the ink pigment itself, and resin polymer particles.

The second "curing" heater then removes the alcohols and heats the resin to melting point where it essentially encapsulates the ink pigment inside, giving it the outdoor durability.

Thus it seems the first heater may not be removing enough water from the ink, leaving water to interefere with the efficiency of the curing process.

Only problem is, as Marco points out, you can raise the temps too high and cause other issues so it is a balancing act.

Let me know if i've understood your issue correctly.

Thanks for your input Hotspur.

I was more putting the issue out there rather than looking for a solution. We are leaving it up to HP to work it out. I'd consider ourselves advanced users in both RIP and hardware. Prints off the machine are dry, it's later they become oily if the face of the print is covered. Even on 16 pass! I think its fair to say that this could potentially cause problems later on if a laminate was applied before the print is completely cured. Try printing large highly saturated solids across the print width and roll the print up immediately after printing. If it's still dry then you've got no problems. Hopefully this is just isolated to our machine, but it appears to be operating correctly apparently.

Thanks

We have seen the 'oil film' quite a couple of times. In those cases the medias weren't compatible and weren't certified by HP.

But: we have tried to reduce inks, light inks, speeds etc. Can you let us know which media we're talking about here? Brand, name, type (paper, vinyl etc)? I can check in our database for compatbility information if you like.

Marco
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Offline ALC Posted 08-18-2010 - 02:11 PM
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(08-16-2010 12:13 AM)MarcoRoos Wrote:  
(08-13-2010 06:48 PM)ALC Wrote:  
(08-13-2010 03:02 AM)Hotspur Wrote:  Hi ALC

That's really interesting - can you give some more details..

Are you saying prints are sticking together when stacked or rolled? also what media are you using and how fast are you driving the printer?

All substrates should be fully dry and cured on leaving the printer - you may see a slight "matting" appearence on heavily inked areas but this should be cured and not oily or sticky.

I have seen sticky prints before though. When the drying temp was too low and the print speed too high to remove all the water from the ink before it went to the curing stage. An alteration to the settings solved this issue.

Also sometimes a low curing temp has left the surface wet with partially-cured ink. However if it is this then it will never cure and you are saying it eventually dries so that leads me to the first heater which removes the water being the issue.

I have also seen media stored & used in humid conditions which increased the natural moisture content of the substrate beyond that which the normal canned settings could cope - a change to the environmental conditions was the solution here so maybe there is a way to solve your problem.

I have printed many HP and non-HP medias on the L25 and have not seen a sticky oily film under normal conditions that could not be sorted by a revised media setup or had issues with stacking or rolling requiring gassing off, so hopefully there will be an answer to this.

Technically the first heater removes the carrier part of the ink - in the case of Latex this is water & makes up most of the total ink volume.

This then leaves the rest which is a mixture of alcohols, the ink pigment itself, and resin polymer particles.

The second "curing" heater then removes the alcohols and heats the resin to melting point where it essentially encapsulates the ink pigment inside, giving it the outdoor durability.

Thus it seems the first heater may not be removing enough water from the ink, leaving water to interefere with the efficiency of the curing process.

Only problem is, as Marco points out, you can raise the temps too high and cause other issues so it is a balancing act.

Let me know if i've understood your issue correctly.

Thanks for your input Hotspur.

I was more putting the issue out there rather than looking for a solution. We are leaving it up to HP to work it out. I'd consider ourselves advanced users in both RIP and hardware. Prints off the machine are dry, it's later they become oily if the face of the print is covered. Even on 16 pass! I think its fair to say that this could potentially cause problems later on if a laminate was applied before the print is completely cured. Try printing large highly saturated solids across the print width and roll the print up immediately after printing. If it's still dry then you've got no problems. Hopefully this is just isolated to our machine, but it appears to be operating correctly apparently.

Thanks

We have seen the 'oil film' quite a couple of times. In those cases the medias weren't compatible and weren't certified by HP.

But: we have tried to reduce inks, light inks, speeds etc. Can you let us know which media we're talking about here? Brand, name, type (paper, vinyl etc)? I can check in our database for compatbility information if you like.

Marco

3M IJ180Cv3-10, HP HDPE Banner, PVC free wallpaper etc. 10pass Bi
Everyone has their own tolerances on what is acceptable or not. The oily film does go away when given time in a warm environment (or weeks in a cold one) which is not exactly 'laminate straight after printing'. When we print and mount a job to find it wet the next day, it is not acceptable for us. I have tested at another site and came up with the same greasy film there too.
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Offline b-man Posted 08-19-2010 - 10:31 AM
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I've heard about the 'oily film' appearing after a while on some Backlit materials (not HP certified).
/Peter
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Offline Scott Posted 08-19-2010 - 05:04 PM
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(08-19-2010 10:31 AM)b-man Wrote:  I've heard about the 'oily film' appearing after a while on some Backlit materials (not HP certified).
/Peter

Well that explains it I think.

We had run a couple prints shortly after we got our L65500 on some 3M IJ63-20 (changeable backlit). I was told after the install that the ink didn't seem to be dry as there appeared to be a thin layer of ink on the surface that wasn't completely cured.

I bet it was the 'oily film' in question. I also noticed that the IJ63-20 is not a certified material for the latex inks. We haven't used that material since, as we normally run the IJ3630 cast translucent, which is certified, and we haven't seen anything like that since.

Interesting...

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Offline b-man Posted 08-19-2010 - 10:03 PM
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I think, with the Latex printers you need to accept more limits than you're used to as a solvent user. Also more heat related reactions. The 'window of succes' with medias is somewhat 'smaller' - but when a media works, it's really reliable to print on these printers...
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Offline MarcoRoos Posted 08-20-2010 - 05:47 AM
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(08-19-2010 10:03 PM)b-man Wrote:  I think, with the Latex printers you need to accept more limits than you're used to as a solvent user. Also more heat related reactions. The 'window of succes' with medias is somewhat 'smaller' - but when a media works, it's really reliable to print on these printers...

I agree to what b-man says. The oily film is simply a media that doesn't allow the ink to dry. Raising the curing temperature should solve it. If it doesn't, the media is simply not compatible.
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Offline Todddy Posted 05-05-2011 - 05:37 AM
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x10
Printer(s):
l25500, sj-645ex, blizzard...

Hello,

I have one question, is it possible to print in double-passes on the L25500?? I didn't find the possibility. I have to print on a clear vinyl and usually it's a good solution to obtain perfect saturated colors.
Thanks in advance.
Tristan
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Offline walter_cfl Posted 05-12-2011 - 10:11 PM
Post: #23
Member
55 Posts
Member

Onyx Version:
X11, X12
Printer(s):
Latex, UV, LED-UV

(05-05-2011 05:37 AM)Todddy Wrote:  Hello,

I have one question, is it possible to print in double-passes on the L25500?? I didn't find the possibility. I have to print on a clear vinyl and usually it's a good solution to obtain perfect saturated colors.
Thanks in advance.
Tristan

/Configure Printer
/Media/your media type
/Mode Options/your media mode
/Option
/Tick "High Ink Level"
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Offline Todddy Posted 05-16-2011 - 01:00 AM
Post: #24
Member
3 Posts
Member

Onyx Version:
x10
Printer(s):
l25500, sj-645ex, blizzard...

(05-12-2011 10:11 PM)walter_cfl Wrote:  
(05-05-2011 05:37 AM)Todddy Wrote:  Hello,

I have one question, is it possible to print in double-passes on the L25500?? I didn't find the possibility. I have to print on a clear vinyl and usually it's a good solution to obtain perfect saturated colors.
Thanks in advance.
Tristan

/Configure Printer
/Media/your media type
/Mode Options/your media mode
/Option
/Tick "High Ink Level"


Ok thanks, but I have to make a new profile to activate this option and make new linearization. I would like to know if it was possible to change with an existing profile but I think not.
Thanks for your reply.
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Offline powertgraphix Posted 05-26-2011 - 04:24 AM
Post: #25
Member
1 Posts
Member

Onyx Version:
signez v 7.0
Printer(s):
HP L22550

I am about to buy a HP L25500. My Electrician says I am only pulling 212 to the building. The Power Requirements say that the 60" is 220 - 240. Someone told me that the requirements of the printer were 220 + or- 10% which would put the required min. at 198. Does anyone know if that is true or not?
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